How to deploy DisplayLink MSI files in a corporate environment with GPO or SCCM

Introduction

This article is intended to give a Windows Administrator a brief overview of Deploying DisplayLink’s Corporate Installer across a Windows Active Directory Domain.

DisplayLink provide the Microsoft Installer files, or a driver package to allow remote deployment of DisplayLink software. This article covers the deployment of the MSI files. 

Deployment of a driver package, using an INF file, is covered in this article.

Target Audience


Any IT Professional who is familiar with Windows Server, Group Policy, and deploying software company-wide via Group Policy Software Installation (GPSI) or via SCCM (System Center Configuration Manager)

Corporate Install Download


DisplayLink corporate install images can be downloaded from: http://www.displaylink.com/corporateinstall (signup required)

System Compatibility check


It recommended that a system compatibility check is run on the PC system before deploying the DisplayLink software.

For more information about the System Compatibility Check, please refer to this article.

Deploying the DisplayLink Software using the MSI files

It is not possible to install these MSI files just by double clicking them to install. If User Access Control (UAC) is enabled on the tested machine during an installation, the  audio and Ethernet drivers will silently fail to install due to an “access denied” error (even if a user is prompted for elevation). 


If testing without using GPO, start the installation from command line with administrative privileges. The following commands can be used to install the MSI packages using msiexec on the command line:

msiexec /i %SETUP%\DisplayLinkCore.msi /norestart /quiet
Followed by:
msiexec /i %SETUP%\Setup.msi /norestart /quiet

About the DisplayLink MSI files

8.4 or later


A single MSI file can be deployed. The version of the MSI file differs depending on the Windows OS version, as the graphics architecture changed in Windows 10 Anniversary update 2016.

The corporate install zip file contains the following files from v8.4:

  • Win32
    • DisplayLink_Win10RS.msi
    • DisplayLink_Win7-10TH2.msi
  • Win64
    • DisplayLink_Win10RS.msi
    • DisplayLink_Win7-10TH2.msi
DisplayLink_Win7-10TH2.msi should be deployed to systems running Windows 7 to Windows 10 Threshold 2 (OS build 10.0.10586)
DisplayLink_Win10RS.msi  should be deployed to systems running Windows 10 Redstone onwards (OS build 10.0.14393)

8.0 until 8.3


From V8.0 a single MSI file can be deployed. The version of the MSI file differs depending on the Windows OS version, as the graphics architecture changed in Windows 10 Anniversary update 2016.

The corporate install zip file contains the following files from v8.0:

  • Win32
    • DisplayLink_Win10RS1.msi
    • DisplayLink_Win7-10TH2.msi
  • Win64
    • DisplayLink_Win10RS1.msi
    • DisplayLink_Win7-10TH2.msi
DisplayLink_Win7-10TH2.msi should be deployed to systems running Windows 7 to Windows 10 Threshold 2 (OS build 10.0.10586)
DisplayLink_Win10RS1.msi  should be deployed to systems running Windows 10 Redstone onwards (OS build 10.0.14393)

7.9 or earlier


Due to the nature of our Software, you’ll receive a Zip file with four MSIs inside; DisplayLinkCore.msi and Setup.msi both in 32-bits and 64-bits. DisplayLink software is more than a USB driver. A virtual graphics driver and DisplayLink pixel encoder also need to be installed for DisplayLink devices to correctly function.

DisplayLinkCore.msi


The DisplayLink Core software provides core DisplayLink functionality. It installs the DisplayLink USB Graphics Card Driver, as well as the basic DisplayLink GUI in the system tray.

Setup.msi


The Setup file provides additional functionality, such as the ability to recognise hardware button presses on Docking Stations. Think of it like installing software on a freshly-installed laptop that enables the Function key buttons.

Installation requirements


Both files are required for proper functionality of the DisplayLink software, and must be installed in a specific order; Core first, then Setup.

To achieve this, add the Core Software to GPSI first, and then add the Setup.msi afterwards. As GPSI installs MSIs based on Timestamp, it should install the MSIs in the correct order.

In case of using SCCM, make the installation of the Setup package dependent on the installation of the Core package, this way the Core package will always be installed first.

Setting up the GPOs and File Shares


At the time of writing, our MSIs are available in two flavours: 32-bit and 64-bit. If you have both 32-bit and 64-bit Operating Systems in your organisation, you’ll need to create two GPOs; one for 32-bit and one for 64-bit. For reference, the 32-bit installer will not install on a 64-bit OS.

As this guide assumes knowledge of Group Policy, this section will be brief.

Setting up the File Shares 


  1. Download the DisplayLink Corporate install files from here: http://www.displaylink.com/corporateinstall/
  2. Create or use an existing file share for deploying software and drivers. The share must be accessible by the System user in order for GPSI to install the software on the target PCs
  3. Extract the .zip that was downloaded into a DisplayLink MSI directory on your network file share. Your extracted files should look like this:

Creating the 32-bit GPO


  1. Create a new Group Policy Object (GPO) in the Group Policy Management Console (GPMC) In this guide, we’ll be calling it DisplayLink Device Driver Deployment - 32-bit. You may wish to call it something else, particularly if you’re only interested in deploying the DisplayLink driver, and not extra drivers, such as Ethernet.
  2. Put the 32-bit DisplayLinkCore.msi and Setup.msi onto a network file share.
  3. Edit the GPO you just created, and go to: Computer Configuration > Policies > Software Settings > Software installation
  4. Right click > New > Package...
  5. Add and Assign DisplayLinkCore.msi
  6. Add and Assign Setup.msi

Creating the 64-bit GPO


  1. Create a new Group Policy Object (GPO) in the Group Policy Management Console (GPMC). In this guide, we’ll be calling it DisplayLink Device Driver Deployment - 64-bit. You may wish to call it something else, particularly if you’re only interested in deploying the DisplayLink driver, and not extra drivers, such as Ethernet.
  2. Put the 64-bit DisplayLinkCore.msi and Setup.msi onto a network file share.
  3. Edit the GPO you just created, and go to: Computer Configuration > Policies > Software Settings > Software installation
  4. Right click > New > Package...
  5. Add and Assign DisplayLinkCore.msi
  6. Add and Assign Setup.msi

Targeting 32-bit and 64-bit Operating Systems


To ensure that only the correct MSI is installed on the correct architecture, it’s necessary to utilise Group Policy’s WMI Filtering to target the correct OS architecture.

Targeting only 32-bit Operating Systems

Setting up the WMI Filter

  1. Open up the Group Policy Management Console (GPMC)
  2. Locate WMI Filters in the left panel
  3. Right click on WMI Filters and choose “New…”
  4. Give the WMI Filter an appropriate name and description. For example, “Check for 32-bit”
  5. Click Add, to add a new query
  6. Add the following Query: Select AddressWidth from Win32_Processor where (AddressWidth="32")
  7. Click OK, then Save

Applying the WMI Filter to the Group Policy Object

  1. Locate your 32-bit GPO in GPMC and click on it
  2. You should now see the GPO appear in the Right-hand pane
  3. Under the Scope Tab, click on the Dropdown box underneath “WMI Filtering” and choose the 32-bit WMI filter
  4. This GPO will now only be applied to 32-bit Operating Systems

Targeting only 64-bit Operating Systems

Setting up the WMI Filter

  1. Open up the Group Policy Management Console (GPMC)
  2. Locate WMI Filters
  3. Right click on WMI Filters and choose “New…”
  4. Give the WMI Filter an appropriate name and description. For example, “Check for 64-bit”
  5. Click Add, to add a new query
  6. Add the following Query: Select AddressWidth from Win32_Processor where (AddressWidth="64")
  7. Click OK, then Save

Applying the WMI Filter to the Group Policy Object

  1. Locate your 64-bit GPO in GPMC and click on it
  2. You should now see the GPO appear in the Right-hand pane
  3. Under the Scope Tab, click on the Dropdown box underneath “WMI Filtering” and choose the 64-bit WMI filter
  4. This GPO will now only be applied to 64-bit Operating Systems

Setting up SCCM


This section will only explain how to deploy the DisplayLink Software using SCCM. A requirement for this is a working Active Directory and SCCM environment with the Configuration Manager Client installed, or being pushed, to the target machines.
This guide is showing the install of x64 bit Windows 10 RS1 onward, these steps will also work for x32 bit and other supported Windows OS's

This guide will assume admin knowledge of System Center Configuration Manager.

Setting up the File Share

  1. Download the DisplayLink Corporate install files from here: http://www.displaylink.com/corporateinstall/
  2. Create or use an existing file share for deploying software and drivers. The share must have at least read permission rights for the end users in order for SCCM to install the software on the target PCs.
  3. Extract the .zip that was downloaded into a DisplayLink MSI directory on your network file share. Your extracted files should look like this:

Creating the installation packages


  1. In Software Library \ Overview \ Application Management \ Applications, create a new application:


  2. Select “Automatically detect…” and “Type” as “Windows Installer (*.msi file)”. Browse to the network share used and select the “DisplayLink_xxxxx.msi” file.


  3. If everything is correct, the following screen should appear:


  4. Give the application a name, in this case the 64-bits version is being created. The name given here will appear in the list of applications in SCCM.


  5. When the creation of the application is complete, the following screen appears.


Setting the device collections

  1. In Assets and Compliance \ Device Collections, create new device collections suitable for your corporate OS deployment
  2. In this example, we are using Windows 10 RS1 (OS build 14393):  Create your device collection.  Right click and select Properties.


  3.   Add query statement.  Edit query statement to look as below.


  4. OK this page and apply to device collection.

Deploying the application


  1.   Navigate back to the application that was created earlier.
  2.   Righ click on this application and select deploy.


  3.   Select the device collection that the application is going to be deployed to.



  4.   Distribute this to your distribution points.



  5.   Select either an available deployed or a required depoyment.


  6. You should now see this page displayed.



Testing the DisplayLink software deployment

Testing GPO


It’s best to test the GPO works before rolling it out company-wide:
  1. Make a Test OU and put a few Test or Lab PCs in the OU. Call it something like “DPinst Test Computers”
  2. Apply the DPinst GPO to the Test Computer OU
  3. If your AD DC infrastructure is large, you may need to wait a while for the new GPO to propagate around.
  4. On the test computers, add a domain user as a Limited Account on the Test PCs
  5. Run: gpupdate on the Test PCs
  6. Reboot the Test PCs
  7. Log in as the limited user and plug in the DisplayLink device. If the Drivers install successfully, everything went OK. If the drivers didn’t install, wait a while and reboot again. It may be that Group Policy wasn’t refreshed properly on the Test PC, or the GPO hasn’t propagated fully yet. It can sometimes take two or three reboots to pick up the new Group Policy settings.
  8. Once everything works as expected, it should then be safe to deploy the solution onto the corporate network.

Rolling out the Driver


To roll out the driver, simply link the GPO to which Computer OU you want to deploy the driver to.

After installation


In order for the DisplayLink-enabled hardware to function properly, a subsequent reboot may be required after GPSI has installed the DisplayLink software on the end-users machine. This is normal, as installing a graphics driver under Windows usually requires a reboot, post-installation.


Testing SCCM


To test that the DisplayLink Driver has installed properly, open Software Center and run the application.
If successful you should see the following window.

Uninstalling the MSI installed Drivers


Follow this article for instructions on how to uninstall the MSI files

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