I suggest you...

Make the Linux driver open source and get it into the kernel

If the DisplayLink driver existed in the kernel, it would be SO much easier for the users to get it working. In my role as Chief Digital Officer for a large company (of 8000 people), I would probably have bought 500 of these devices IF the driver were just upstream (you know, how Linux devices normally "just work" without the aggro common in the Windows world). However, the annoyance of a manual driver install, especially when it's broken on updates to newer kernels, is just something I wouldn't want to invest in. Please consider that proprietary drivers are serious impediment to sales, and just work with a willing community upstream.

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    Richard NeillRichard Neill shared this idea  ·   ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →

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      • Lincoln LavoieLincoln Lavoie commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Hugely agree, I'm very tired of having to re-hack this together after every kernel update / upgrade. Keeping things as a manual upgrade is so far from the current world of Linux, and the agile CI/CD processes.

      • Sylvain BougerelSylvain Bougerel commented  ·   ·  Flag as inappropriate

        Agreed. If the compression technology is too proprietary to be released, then make 2 separate modules, one proprietary to load the compression algorithms, one open source so that kernel developers can easily port the module and update with each new kernel, while the compression algorithm remains closed source and proprietary. That way is best of both worlds.

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